In Memory of
ROBERT WILLIAM REYNOLDS
Private 14391974
5th Bn., Essex Regiment
who died on Saturday, 15th January 1944.
Age 28.
 
 
Commonwealth
War Graves
Commission
 
 
            Casualty_Details :       2376090
 
                      Certificate :       2376090
 
 
Personal Information
Date of birth 27th August 1915.
 
Son of Robert Metson Reynolds and Dorothy Alice Reynolds.
 
The family lived at 14, Brookfield Villas, Shalford Road. Robert came from a large family, of which the children were Robert William, Doris, Gladys, Frank, Janette, Evelyn (known as June), Marie, John and Wilfred.
 
Robert would have been the nephew of Frank who died in World War I.
 
The photograph of Robert was kindly donated by Mrs Ann Hooks of Rayne who is a descendant of the Reynolds family.

.

 
Memorial: Grave
 
Reference/Panel Number:

Location:
SANGRO RIVER WAR CEMETERY, ItalyXVII. A. 43.

The Sangro River War Cemetery lies in the Contrada Sentinelle in the Commune of Torino di Sangro, Province of Chieti. Take the road SS16 between Pescara and Vasto from the autostrada A14 exit at Val di Sangro. At about 2.5 km from this exit turn right onto the SS16 for nearly 2 km. There is then a sharp right turn up to cemetery. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime.

 The site of Sangro River War Cemetery was selected by the 5th Corps. Into it were concentrated the graves of men who lost their lives in the fierce fighting on the Adriatic sector of the front in November-December 1943, and during the subsequent static period there. The 8th Indian Division was on this sector during these months; the 4th Indian Division arrived in January 1944, and the 10th Indian Division in April 1944. There are therefore many Muslim burials in the cemetery, in plots VI, VII, XIII and XVIII; and the cemetery contains one of the three cremation memorials in Italy (the others being in Forli Indian Army War Cemetery and in Rimini Ghurkha War Cemetery). The New Zealand Division also suffered heavily in the fighting for and beyond the Sangro River, and many of their graves are here. The Canadians have their own cemetery not far off, at Moro River. Sangro River War Cemetery contains, besides the graves of those who died in battle or of wounds, those of quite a number of British prisoners of war who escaped and died either of exposure or otherwise while trying to reach the British lines.

There are now 2,500, 1939-45 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, nearly 100 are unidentified.

 
Theatre of War